christopher paolini (Tag)


Tronjheim's Star SapphireIn 2006, several Eragon video games were released alongside the movie. What many fans don’t know is that the video game largely drew its inspiration and themes from the books, not the film.

This is because the game’s development team began production on the game long before the Eragon movie was in production, allowing them to read and comb the books for inspiration. While the final product did incorporate many elements of the film, the books remained the game’s core inspiration.  Concept art used to develop the game reflects inspiration from the source material, rather than just the film (some hints of movie inspiration can be found in several pieces).

Two talented concept artists have been kind enough to share their many video game illustrations with us and have discussed their work, inspirations, and process in two great interviews. Today, we look at the art of Michael “Rusty” Drake, a long-time illustrator and talented concept artist. Rusty was part of the game’s core concept art team and was responsible for many incredible pieces depicting Urgals and various Alagaësia locations, including Tronjheim and Gil’ead.

Our gallery of Rusty’s artwork is accompanied by descriptions explaining each illustration’s contents:

We encourage you to join us tomorrow as we release our interview with Rusty, who sheds some light on the process behind adapting the book as a video game, how he was inspired by the world of Alagaësia, and more!

Now we ask: What’s your favorite piece of video game concept art by Rusty? Let us know in the comments!

Is there a place in Hollywood for a new Eragon movie?

BromYes.

That’s the short answer. What about a more detailed look at why it will work?

Harry Paved the Way

Fantasy is in; it has been for years, and it isn’t going away any time soon. With a flick of her wand, J.K. Rowling unintentionally kicked off a successful fantasy YA revolution, both in print and on the big screen. The Harry Potter films appealed to those who previously didn’t enjoy reading, as well as those outside of its target audience – adults. Harry Potter opened the door for massive young adult franchises, both in print and on the big screen. New readers flooded bookstores, and after devouring Rowling’s series, were hungry for more stories beyond Hogwarts’ gates.

Eragon was one of the earliest to the party, enjoying a wide publication in 2003 and quickly gaining traction with readers.  From there, many other book series took off, including Twilight and Hunger Games. Studios took note and quickly gobbled up the film rights, pushing them to the big screen for near-guaranteed success.

It’s no coincidence that Hunger Games, Twilight, and other franchises have gone on to dominate the box office. Their global audiences are vast and passionate, and the team behind each film paid careful attention to the source material, author, and existing audience when creating the movie. Sure, each of the franchises’ films had to take certain creative liberties when adapting the book, but those careful, well-thought-out changes are to be expected. And that’s where Eragon deviated from the tried-and-true method used by successful book-to-movie franchises: its creative liberties were not careful or well-thought out. It ignored its vast and passionate audience. It didn’t take it seriously.

The Avengers Enter the Ring

Since the release of Harry Potter, dozens of fantasy-based films have soared at the box office. A majority of these were adaptations, proving that it can be done well and make substantial amounts of money. Marvel burst into the arena, paving the way for a superhero takeover. While not strictly fantasy, these films hit the same audience as the aforementioned series and share many of the same elements and themes. Combined, these book and comic-based film franchises have grossed tens of billions of dollars. They’re unstoppable juggernauts, and it’s time for Eragon to join their ranks.

Post-Apocalyptic Dystopian Futures Take Over

We’re getting a bit tired of these dystopian movies, and we’re certainly tired of vampires and zombies. After the success of Twilight, everyone jumped on the vampire bandwagon. We saw books, films, television shows, video games, and more shoved down our throats. What happened? Vampires faded and zombies rose. With the exception of The Walking Dead, that fad has all but gone back to grave, likely due to the over-saturation vampires also suffered from.

And we’re getting there with post-apocalypse and dystopian media. Hunger Games was “the next Harry Potter,” and publishers and studios took note. They rushed to fill book stores and theaters with more of the same, leading us to sub-par films such as Divergent. But even those managed to find success, and that series continues to draw millions at the box office. The Maze Runner offered a fresh take on the genre, but we’re still left hoping studios will break the mold and venture into other territory. Perhaps…

Dragons!

Dragons have been a staple of fantasy since its inception. The Inheritance Cycle, Dragon Riders of Pern, Seraphina, Harper Hall, Dragons in Our Midst, A Song of Ice and Fire, and many more have held a special place on fantasy readers’ bookshelves. However, dragons never became a fad at the box office, and we believe this had a large impact on the fantasy creatures’ longevity in the fantasy world. The market isn’t over-saturated by dragon films, and that’s a very good thing.

Looking toward the box office, we immediately notice that there have been just nine movies featuring dragons over the past decade, with only a half of those heavily focusing on dragons: The Hobbit trilogy and the two How to Train Your Dragon films. That’s a market open for the taking! These nine films have grossed an astounding $6.3 billion alone over the past decade – and that’s not including DVD/BluRay sales, rentals, and streaming! Dragons are cash cows. Or cash dragons.

With The Hobbit having recently finished its run and How to Train Your Dragon 3 not due to hit theaters until summer 2018, we see an opportunity for Fox to jump in and dominate the dragon market. After all, dragons are more powerful than wizards, eat vampires and zombies for breakfast, and cause apocalypses. Those genres stand no chance.

The Game of Thrones Revolution

Like Harry Potter did for non-readers, Game of Thrones paved the way for a broader audience enjoying fantasy and dragons. Fans who have never taken part in fantasy franchises are flocking to the show in droves, making it one of cable’s most successful shows ever.

Playing on gritty, gory, and adult themes not previously seen in fantasy television and films, the show and its universe has managed to be taken seriously and avoid the cheesiness that often plagues media in that genre. While Eragon would avoid the hyper-sexual themes seen in Game of Thrones, its would benefit largely from following the show’s model, utilizing its brilliant delivery of epic politics, battles, dragons, locations, and character development to build a rich, mature, and gritty Alagaësia on the big screen.

A large thing to note is the fact that the Inheritance Cycle is a heavy magic world, in comparison to Game of Thrones‘ light magic world, providing a challenge for a potential Eragon film reboot: how to incorporate magic without deviating into cheesy territory, or feeling to capture a true mature feel to the world’s rich magic system. We’re sure a talented production team can figure that out.

Cornering the untapped Game of Thrones-like box office area would be a great move for Fox.

Wrapping Up

There’s a huge market ready to be conquered. The YA fantasy book world has showed no signs of slowing, book consumption is at an all-time high, and moviegoers are showing an endless hunger for films Eragon closely aligns to. We can’t help but wonder why Fox isn’t mulling the idea – it almost seems like a no-brainer.

Taking on a dark, mature, and gritty feel similar to Game of Thrones, incorporating the successful acting, special effects, and audience elements used to make hits out of Harry Potter and Hunger Games, and forging a unique path of success for itself, we know there’s a place in Hollywood for Eragon.

And that place is starving for dragons.

Want to see Eragon take its rightful place in Hollywood? We do too! We recently launched a petition asking Fox to consider rebooting the Inheritance Cycle film franchise. Over 33,000 fans have joined in by adding their signature. If you haven’t already, please consider doing so, and share the petition with your friends! Let’s make it happen.

Ever wonder what it would be like to vacation in the realm traveled by Eragon and Saphira?  In a new look at the fantasy world of Inheritance, we’ll traverse the Alagaësia atlas, exploring different lands while planning a trip to each destination.

hadarac post card copy

Hail and Well Met, Traveler!

Welcome to the first stop on our tour through Alagaësia: the Hadarac Desert.  We’ll be providing you with all of the information and tips needed to have an enjoyable fantasy holiday!

SIGHTS

Be prepared for hot, dry weather by day and frigid temperatures at night. But don’t let the climate scare you away! Deserts can be harsh, but with the right preparation, you and your companions will enjoy a safe journey!

If there is one sight to behold on a visit to the Desert, make it the mountain range of Du Fells Nángoröth, located centrally in the Hadarac stretch.  Known as home to the first dragons, this small range of mountains at one time housed disgorged Eldunarì energy stores of these ancestral dragons.

Visitors interested in extending their trip can venture east toward the Beor Mountains, seen on the horizon throughout the entirety of your journey. These mountains are home to the dwarves and various awe-inspiring beasts. View full article »

article-headerExcited about the idea of a rebooted Inheritance Cycle film franchise? We are too! Join the over 25,000 fans who have signed the Eragon movie petition by adding your signature!

Fox stumbled with Eragon and the mistakes cost them a franchise. Before we dive deeper into these mistakes and how those mistakes led to the demise of the film, we’re going to explore the more important question: If the Eragon movie is rebooted, what does Fox need to do to get it right?

We recently asked fans on Facebook what they think needs to be done to get it right. We’re coupling some of the best responses with ideas and analysis of our own. View full article »

over20000Our community spoke clearly: we want to see the Inheritance Cycle film franchise rebooted!

It’s been nearly nine years since the release of Eragon on the big screen, leaving fans less than satisfied. Fox has been radio silent on the future of the franchise since.

Last Thursday, we released an article exploring when we will possibly see the Inheritance Cycle rebooted. We also released a petition imploring Fox, the film rights holder, to reboot the franchise.

The response was overwhelming – well beyond anything we expected. Over 4,000 fans signed the petition in its first day, with the count now totaling over 20,000. In under 24 hours, we saw:

  • 720,000 fans reached reached on social media
  • 17,100+ likes on Facebook
  • 2,400+ comments on Facebook
  • 2,200+ shares on Facebook
  • 93 retweets on Twitter
  • 86 favorites on Twitter

Since then, those numbers have increased even further and our campaign is only just getting started.

  • We hit 5,500 signatures on Friday
  • We hit 19,000 signatures on Saturday
  • We hit 20,000 signatures on Sunday
  • 1,139,000 fans reached on social media since Thursday
  • 32,077 status “likes” on Facebook since Thursday
  • 3,964 status comments on Facebook since Thursday
  • 5,518 status shares on Facebook since Thursday
  • 143 retweets and 209 favorites on Twitter since Thursday
  • 403 notes on Tumblr since Thursday
  • 682,000 visits to Shur’tugal since Thursday

Later this week, we’ll be exploring how Fox should go about making a reboot in a new article. We also have several additional articles planned, including:

  • At what point did the film begin to lose its heart, and how could it have recovered?
  • Which movies followed in Eragon’s footsteps, and were their mistakes similar to those of the Eragon movie?
  • What elements in movies such as Hunger Games, Twilight, Fault in Our Stars, and Maze Runner appeal to their audiences?
  • Is there a place in Hollywood for an Inheritance Cycle movie reboot?
  • What other mediums could the Inheritance Cycle work well in?

Most importantly, we need as many fans as possible to show their support for a full reboot of the franchise by signing our petition. If you haven’t already, please consider adding your signature. If you have friends who are fellow readers, ask them to join in too!

Let’s show Fox that we are passionate about the series and fully stand behind a proper reboot!

View and sign the petition!

When will we see the next Inheritance Cycle movie?

Eragon movie

Get involved! Join thousands of fellow fans by signing our petition to Fox, encouraging them to reboot the movie franchise!

It’s the second most asked question we get here on Shur’tugal (“When will we see Book 5?” comes in first). It isn’t hard to understand why: the 2006 Eragon movie was a less-than-stellar take on a book we are all passionate about. Mistakes were made, the movie didn’t quite resonate with audiences, and hopes of a film franchise faded.

Let’s address the big question straight away: there is no news from Fox regarding a future film. The studio has been silent for nearly a decade. However, future films are still possible, and it is our hope that the recent success of similar films (which we explore below) may help open their eyes to the series’ big screen potential.

Fox’s purchase of the film rights was first announced in early 2004, aimed at a 2005 release. Filming began in the summer of 2005, with the intent to release the film exactly one year later. Bumped from June, 2006, the film hit theaters in December, 2006.

The film industry often defines a “flop” as a film that fails to earn back its budget. In the case of Eragon, the movie more than doubled its budget of $100 million (not including its marketing budget, rumored to have been substantial). Eragon opened to $23 million in the United States, earning a total of $75m during the entirety of its domestic run. The film saw success overseas, grossing $174.4m for a total worldwide take of $249m. (These totals do not include DVD sales or rentals, where Eragon is rumored to have done quite well.)

The box office wasn’t the film’s only problem; critics panned the film and audiences were on the fence. Rotten Tomatoes, a popular review aggregator, offers a critic score of just 16% and average audience rating of 47%. (Other films’ critic scores: Hunger Games – 86%, Maze Runner – 63%, and even Twilight scored 47%.)

Reviewing audience scores and the total box office take leads us to a major conclusion: the film did have an audience. We’re left wondering what the film’s true potential would have been if the work were approached differently. Could the franchise have matched the success of more recent book-to-movie adaptations, such as Twilight, Hunger Games, and Harry Potter? We think so.

We’re closing in on a decade of no news about a new Inheritance movie. We know that Fox had high hopes for Eragon, intending from the start to build a powerful film franchise based on the series and that these hopes were never realized.

Much has changed over the past nine years. Movie studios (Lionsgate, Sony, Fox) have made a key observation: staying true to the formula that made books successful will often lead to box office success. Moving away from what fans loved in the books—such as seen in Percy Jackson, Beautiful Creatures, and Mortal Instruments—saw results similar to Eragon. These movies underline the importance of taking the adaptation’s source material seriously.

The book-to-movie franchises that have nailed it over the past decade, such as the Maze Runner (James Dashner, produced by Fox), The Hunger Games (Susanne Collins, Lionsgate), and The Fault in Our Stars* (John Green, Fox), all had key things in common: the authors were regularly consulted (in John Green’s case, the author was allowed to live on set); they remained in touch with the film’s fan base, working to keep them passionate, excited, and happy with the results; and lastly, the studios gave the films proper treatment, respecting their universes and avoiding the cheesiness that often plagues fantasy and sci-fi adaptations.

*While The Fault in Our Stars is not a fantasy movie, it highlights the importance of working with the author, staying true to the source material, and being loyal to its fans. The film grossed $305m on a $12m budget.

Don’t ignore your audience, don’t disregard the heart of the source material, and work closely with the author – they know their world better than anyone!

Moviegoers are hungry for well-done fantasy/sci-fi, and especially dragons!

  • How to Train Your Dragon and How to Train Your Dragon 2 (DreamWorks Animation/Fox), a series based on the premise of dragons and dragon riders, grossed a combined $1.137 billion in the box office. (critic review average of 98%, 92%, respectively)
  • Peter Jackson’s three part Hobbit adaptation, at its core a fantasy trilogy featuring a dragon, grossed $2.917 billion (critic review average of 64%, 74%, 70% respectively)
  • The Narnia film trilogy launched with a smash hit in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, which grossed $745 million. Its two follow-ups grossed $419.6 and $415.6, for a total series take of $1.58 billion. (critic review average of 76%, 67%, 49% respectively)
  • The Lord of the Rings trilogy conquered the box office with a combined $2.917 billion gross. (critic review average of 91%, 96%, 95% respectively)
  • Hunger Games, Maze Runner, Divergent, Rise of the Guardians, and more total a box office gross in the billions.
  • Another sign of an existing hunger for fantasy: HBO’s massive hit, Game of Thrones, demonstrates that a low-magic fantasy world filled with dragons, battles, and epic politics can attract tens of millions of viewers. It’s one of the most successful cable television shows of all time.

It isn’t impossible to make a book-to-movie adaptation that wins over existing fans and makes new ones. In fact, studios seem to be mastering the method as they listen to what the fan communities love about the universe and thoughtfully consider what makes these books the success they were to begin with.

There’s a lot left to explore behind Fox’s Eragon. Here’s a preview of what we’ll be discussing in the coming weeks:

  • At what point did the film begin to lose its heart, and how could it have recovered?
  • Which movies followed in Eragon’s footsteps, and were their mistakes similar to those of the Eragon movie?
  • What elements in movies such as Hunger Games, Twilight, Fault in Our Stars, and Maze Runner appeal to their audiences?
  • Is there a place in Hollywood for an Inheritance Cycle movie reboot?
  • What other mediums could the Inheritance Cycle work well in?
  • If the series is remade, how should they go about it?

While you wait for our next Eragon movie article, be sure to sign our petition to 21st Century Fox, the film rights holder, encouraging them to reboot the Inheritance Cycle on the big screen!

Join Christopher for two book signing events in Utah!

Christopher has announced two back-to-back book signings and events for readers in Utah!

Five Kingdoms: Crystal Keepers launch event!

On March 13th, Christopher will join authors Brandon Mull, Brandon Sanderson, Richard Paul Evans, and Chad Morris for the launch of Mull’s Crystal Keepers, the third book in his Five Kingdons series.

The free event will be held at the Cottonwood High auditorium in Murray, UT, and will feature a comedy show involving all five authors, plus several other talented comedians. A big book signing will follow the show!

More information can be found on the event’s Facebook page.

Signing with Arwen Dayton (Seeker), Rachel Hartman (Seraphina), and Christopher!

On March 14th, Christopher will join Seraphina author Rachel Hartman and Seeker author Arwen Dayton for a book signing! The event will take place at the Barnes & Noble in Orem, UT at 2:00 pm.

More information can be found on the Barnes & Noble event page.

bn-next-project-summary

It has been three years since the release of Inheritance, the final chapter in Christopher Paolini’s Inheritance Cycle, and fans are clamoring for information on Christopher’s next big project – be it set in the world of Alagaesia or in an entirely new universe.

With nearly three years to embark on new projects behind him, Christopher has now begun to speak about his future as a storyteller, including the future of the Inheritance universe and other stories the author plans to tell. Christopher has used his own platforms, including Twitter, as well as interviews and guest articles to detail the work he’s done over the past several years in addition to the projects he is currently working on and his vision for the future of his universes, including Inheritance.

With ten months of planning and months more of writing, Christopher was finally ready to discuss his next project in an article with Barnes and Noble promoting their “Get Pop Cultured” week. Christopher reflected on writing Inheritance, the shock of finishing a project he had spent over twelve years working on, and how he began writing outside of the Inheritance universe.

“Writing the Inheritance Cycle was like training for and competing in the Olympics. For over twelve years, I spent nearly every waking moment working on, thinking about, or discussing the series.” …

“Even though I knew I was approaching the end of the series, even though I’d anticipated it—and planned for it—for years, finishing it was still a shock. All of a sudden, this massive thing that had been the focal point of my life since I was fifteen was . . . gone.

The experience was both terrifying and exhilarating.”

Naturally, after over a decade writing in the same style, within the same universe, and with the same mindset, Christopher didn’t just dive into his next big project. Instead, he dipped his toes into the water, tried his hand at a variety of projects, and generally had fun growing:

“I messed around with a number of short stories, each in a different style. I even tried my hand at a screenplay (they’re harder than they look). And I read as many books and watched as many movies as I could.”

However, it would seem he couldn’t stay away from that new big project for too long:

“Once I had recharged my creative batteries, I knew I was ready to tackle something bigger. Much bigger. So I began researching the information I’d need. For nine to ten months, I scoured the Internet for details obvious and obscure. I called and emailed professors around the world. I spent days hashing over various world-building issues with my friends and family. All so that I could do justice to the setting I had decided on for my next story.

And then, only then, did I start to write.

So far, it’s been a blast. The story is science fiction—one of my first loves, along with fantasy—and full of aliens, spaceships, lasers, strange new planets, and explosions. You know, fun stuff. At the same time, I’m hoping that the story will stir people’s emotions, as well as give them a few interesting things to think about. As with all creative endeavors, there’s no guarantee of success. But I think it’s going to end up being pretty awesome.

Of course, I’m biased.”

Don’t worry – Christopher is making it clear that he’s not abandoning Alagaesia:

“In the long term, I do intend to return to the world of the Inheritance Cycle. However, for now, I’m enjoying stretching my wings and inventing a whole new universe for readers to explore. The stars are our future, and while we may never visit them ourselves, at least we can visit them in our dreams.”

Christopher is definitely hard at work on a project sure to please his long time readers! We’re excited to dive into Christopher’s next adventure and to continue holding our breath for the next Inheritance universe installment, known affectionately by fans as “Book V”.

Speaking of “Book V” – we’ve compiled a massive “Book V and Beyond” page containing everything you need to know about the next Inheritance universe books, including a possible prequel. The page includes comments from Christopher on the content we can expect to see in both books. You won’t want to miss this information!

Now we ask: Are you a fan of science fiction? What do you think Christopher’s book will include? Do you plan on reading his next book?

welcome-back-shurtyIf it’s been a while since you last visited us, welcome back. If you’ve never visited us before, welcome! And if you’ve stuck around, waiting anxiously for updates, thanks for your patience – we hope the coming months of content makes up for it!

We have grand plans for Shur’tugal. We aren’t quite ready to reveal everything just yet, but we can tease some fun and interesting projects coming in the future. Before you get your hopes up, there are no book announcements in the coming weeks (however, we will be discussing Christopher’s next book!). Rather, we’re working on internet-related projects that we know you’ll still be very excited about.

We’ve learned through the years that even when there’s no major news, the community is still ready to band together to discuss, theorize, learn and grow, and we’re planning to build on that to bring the Inheritance fan community together for epic projects and more.

Here’s a sneak peek at what you can expect in the coming weeks and months:

  • Christopher Paolini’s Facebook fan page is about to get a whole lot more exciting! Be sure to “Like” the page on Facebook to keep up with the latest from Christopher
  • Frequent web content is coming, both from Shur’tugal and elsewhere, and you won’t have to wait long to see it all…
  • Fan oriented community content, including major projects, discussions, giveaways, contests and more
  • We’re re-launching the Shur’tugal Fan Fiction website!
  • Lots of fan art reveals, story analysis, looks at Alagaesia being developed in video games, a throwback to the Eragon movie and Eragon video games, and more!
  • Interviews – both new and recaps of old interviews
  • Artist highlights delving deep into the world of Inheritance art, each telling stories of their own
  • Galleries ranging from concept art from the Eragon video game to never-before-seen book tour photos
  • Looking back on big and interesting tweets from Christopher’s personal Twitter account
  • Updates on Christopher’s next projects!

We may even be launching a potential revival of the Inheritance Cycle Book Club podcast, and that’s up to you guys – if enough people want it, we’ll be bringing it back with a huge (and awesome) twist! We’re exploring other, equally exciting community projects ranging from creating soundtracks for the Inheritance Cycle books and to book clubs!

Shur’tugal will be updated two to five times per week for the foreseeable future, with even more updates planned for our social media accounts. From quotes and fan questions to the latest news and information, you won’t want to miss out on our social media content, found on Twitter at @itsshurty and on our Facebook fan page! If you’re a frequent Facebook user, join our growing fan community of over 20,000 Inheritance fans for news before it hits Shur’tugal, frequent fan discussions and more!

As always, we’d love to hear your thoughts and feedback as we begin to find our footing on this new adventure. If you have any features you’d like to see more of or feedback on our first few weeks’ worth of content, please feel free to share it in the comments or on social media.

If you think you may be interested in contributing to the website, please visit the “We’re Hiring” page!

shurtugal-eragon-daybooks-mid-eragonIt’s hard to believe that today marks eleven years since the release of Eragon! That’s over a decade of dragons. Last year, a special 10th anniversary collector’s edition of Eragon was released to celebrate the book’s milestone. The book, which is still available, features a faux textured blue leather cover and binding complete with a new gold-plated book cover design and text. The interior of the book features a letter from Christopher discussing the journey to and after the release of Eragon, his influences, and the impact the series has had on his life. Perhaps most exciting, the book features six stunning illustrations from five world renowned fantasy artists as well as Christopher Paolini himself. You can learn more about the book on our special 10th anniversary collector’s edition page!

Eragon was originally self-published in 2002 by the Paolini family, but the widely-recognized edition of the book was first published by Random House Children’s Books in 2003. Random House first discovered Eragon thanks to the stepson of Carl Hiaasen, who purchased, read, and enjoyed the self-published edition of Eragon while vacationing in Montana. Hiassen’s stepson shared the book with the author who then shared the book with his editor at Random House. The rest is history.

The book’s early success and traction within the young adult community has been attributed to two things: the young age at which Christopher wrote Eragon and the inclusive and original style in which Eragon was written. Fan communities started popping up all over the internet shortly after the book’s launch, with Shur’tugal releasing not far after in March, 2004 (an earlier Shur’tugal release at the end of 2003 was scrapped following technical issues).

Because Shur’tugal launched shortly after the book’s release, we don’t have many pre-launch news stories to share with you. Instead, we have a preview of what Shur’tugal and the community looked like one decade ago:

To help you journey back in time to get a feel for what the Inheritance community used to be like, here are some highlighted news posts from the website’s early days (just a few months after the release of Eragon):

To celebrate today’s milestone, here are some interesting facts about Eragon and the Inheritance Cycle:

  • Plans to create the infamous Eragon movie were first announced in 2004 with a subsequent release in December, 2006.
  • Despite being an unknown author and completely new to the young adult market, Eragon was the third best-selling children’s hardcover book in 2003 and the second best-selling children’s paperback in 2005.
  • The book spent over 121 weeks on the best seller list. Because of the New York Times’ best seller list rules, series with more than two books are combined into one listing, leading Eragon‘s tracking to end prematurely. Eragon achieved many bestselling milestones, including:
    • #1 New York Times Bestseller
    • #1 Publishers Weekly Bestseller
    • Wall Street Journal Bestseller
    • USA Today Bestseller
    • Book Sense Bestseller
  • Eragon has won a number of awards, including (but not limited to) Texas Lone Star Reading List, 2004-5; Book Sense Book of the Year, 2004; Rebecca Caudill Young Readers’ Book Award, 2006; The New York Times Best Seller, No. 1; USA Today Best Seller; Publishers Weekly Best Seller; Wall Street Journal Best Seller, 2005
  • Mike Macauley, owner of Shurtugal.com, launched the website at the age of 14, a year younger than Christopher when he first wrote Eragon!

We invite you to join us in celebrating the eleven year anniversary of the release of Eragon on this special day!

Now we ask: When did you first read Eragon? What is your favorite scene from Eragon? Do you remember your biggest theory for what would happen in Eldest? Let us know in the comments!

Shurtugal.com is © 2004-2014. Shurtugal.com is owned by Mike Macauley, in partnership with Lytherus.com.
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