Paolini and Brooks Online Chat Transcript

A complete transcript from the online chat between Terry Brooks and Christopher Paolini is now available here on Shur’tugal! The two authors visited our friends at Suvudu to discuss fantasy and sci-fi literature with each other, as well as taking questions from the fans who participated in the interview. The entire transcript is available after the jump!

PAOLINI AND BROOKS ONLINE CHAT TRANSCRIPT
October 14th on Suvudu

Suvudu Chat Mod:
Welcome to Suvudu! In a few minutes Terry Brooks and Christopher Paolini will be joining us for a chat. Hold on tight and enjoy the ride!

Betsy Mitchell:
I’m Betsy Mitchell, editor in chief of Del Rey Books and proud to be Terry Brooks’s editor. Terry is one of the architects of the fantasy field as it exists today. His first novel, The Sword of Shannara, came out in 1977 and was a huge bestseller. He’s written many more tales in the Shannara world since then as well as the Word and Void trilogy, a book on writing titled Sometimes the Magic Works, and the Magic Kingdom of Landover series. His most recent New York Times bestseller is a return to the world of the Magic Kingdom: A Princess of Landover. Welcome, Terry!

Michelle F.:
Hi, I’m Michelle, Christopher’s editor. I first read Eragon in 2002—the self-published edition Christopher put out with his family. I immediately fell in love with the story and the world Christopher had created, and when Knopf published the book in 2003, Eragon became an instant New York Times bestseller—and an international sensation. Since then, Christopher has written two more books in the Inheritance cycle—Eldest and Brisingr—and the series has more than 22 million copies in print around the world. Welcome, Christopher!

Terry Brooks:
Greetings from sunny Seattle, Christopher

Christopher Paolini:
Greetings from snowy Montana.

Terry Brooks:
Okay, it’s raining. I lied.

Christopher Paolini:
Ha!

[Comment From Aidan Moher]
It’s Seattle, it’s always raining.


Terry Brooks:
Is there really snow over the other side of the mountains?

Christopher Paolini:
There’s so much, branches are falling off the trees.

Michelle F.:
That’s a great photo from the Maui Writer’s Conference several years back…that was a fun trip for all of us!

[Comment From Zach]
Its freezing out here


[Comment From Paige]
Hi Christopher, hi Terry! It’s raining in Georgia too! =)


Terry Brooks:
Here’s a question on writing. Just to get thing rolling. Who is your favorite character to write about, Eragon aside?

[Comment From kshep]
Wow thats alot of snow


[Comment From Jasmine Arnott]
Ugh. Snow. It’s over 90 degrees down here in Miami. You lucky, lucky Montana people.


[Comment From Brittany Landgrebe]
Yeah, well, at least you all aren’t melting in the Texas heat…


Christopher Paolini:
Saphira, always. She has a sense of humor about herself, which not all of my characters do, and she can eat anyone she doesn’t like, which I think is a rather admirable trait . . . in a dragon at least.

[Comment From Damien]
Hello to Christopher and terry from Rainy old Ireland


[Comment From Langley (Ontario)]
A balmy 6 degrees and clear skies up in Canada


[Comment From suzie]
It’s sunny here – I’m in Adelaide in Australia 🙂


[Comment From Frances]
Hello, it’s cold here in upstate New York.


[Comment From joshlama]
It’s cloudy in Sydney Australia.


[Comment From Lauren]
It’s chilly over here in PA, but no snow yet.


Christopher Paolini:
Sounds like it’s cold everywhere.

Christopher Paolini:
Terry, I’m curious, how do you go about creating an imaginary world? Do you think of the story first, or the setting for the story, or do they evolve together, since one always influences the other? And, has your approach changed over time?

Terry Brooks:
Setting influences story. But story always comes first. I have to have the story in place in my head before any of the rest of it comes alive. But it always changes in the writing. How about that?

[Comment From Hayley sue]
How many books are you expecting Eragon to be?


Betsy Mitchell:
Terry, I know that you use outlines–but not every author does. Christopher, how about you?

Terry Brooks:
Back to Saphira. Do you struggle with voice when developing your characters. I would think that getting Saphira’s voice just the way you want it would be hard – assuming what’s needed is a mix between recognizable and alien. Or does voice come easily for you?

Michelle F.:
The Inheritance cycle will be a total of four books.

Christopher Paolini:
I use outlines. Without them I can’t get more than a few pages into a story.

[Comment From Fatty_Lumpkin]
Greetings Terry and Christopher from SW Washington. I’m a fan of both of your works.


[Comment From Zach]
you guys make me want to start writing. PS Chris and Terry you both are awesome


Christopher Paolini:
Saphira’s voice has always come easily for me; although she’s a dragon, and female, I seem to understand her the best of all my characters, a fact that I attribute to growing up surrounded by strong women and lots of animals.

The biggest difficulty I have with voice is not with my characters’ voices, but with my own narrative voice. I love reading and writing elaborate and archaic prose, a tendency which the genre of fantasy only exacerbates. However, I’m also aware that I’m writing this series in the 21st Century, and that people nowadays, not those a thousand years ago, need to be able to understand and enjoy what I’m trying to say. So, I’m always struggling between using simpler, modern English versus a more formal style, and it’s a conflict that I haven’t really resolved to my satisfaction yet.

Terry Brooks:
Dear Betsy. I have stopped using outlines and am now writing free form. It’s risky, but exciting.

Christopher Paolini:
Fatty_Lumpkin: Hi! Nice to hear from you again.

Christopher Paolini:
Terry, magic features prominently in most of your works. What are some of your narrative goals when developing a system of magic? How do you restrain your characters’ powers so that they don’t turn into gods?

Terry Brooks:
Characters are only interesting when they have to struggle against their own worst tendencies and weaknesses. Magic can’t be a panacea for all problems protagonists encounter. Less is more with magic.

Christopher Paolini:
I like that.

Terry Brooks:
How do you like working with your editor? Is she as tough as I hear?

[Comment From John Day]
Hi Terry. Been a fan since 77.


Michelle F.:
Ha, ha, Terry!

Christopher Paolini:
Michelle has a wonderful eye for both story and language. I’m very, very fortunate to have her as my editor. She’s no tougher on the manuscripts than I am myself, but, more importantly, she keeps me smiling through the process.

Michelle F.:
Thanks, Christopher! You keep me smiling, too!

[Comment From Justin]
can someone tell me what panacea means? lol


Shawn Speakman:
Dictionaries are our friends. 🙂

Terry Brooks:
Justin, I don’t know. I just like the word.

Betsy Mitchell:
Panacea: A remedy for all ills; a solution for all difficulties.

Shawn Speakman:
Show off, Betsy.

Terry Brooks:
As Christopher says, it’s a trope.

Christopher Paolini:
Ha!

[Comment From Ivie]
Awesome word! (What does trope mean?)


Terry Brooks:
Okay, Christopher, here is the big Q. Everyone wants to know. Eventually, you will probably want to leave Eragon’s world and write something new. Have you given any thought to this? Along those same lines, do you feel any pressure about leaving a series that has been so successful?

Suvudu Chat Mod:
Just so everyone knows who is chatting, we’ll post some of your questions when we can. But there are a ton of you here, so keep the comments and questions rolling in and we’ll pick some out at random when we can.

Betsy Mitchell:
Trope: (1) Any literary or rhetorical device, as metaphor, metonymy, synecdoche, or irony, that consists in the use of words in other than their literal sense. (2) Terry just giving us a hard time. 🙂

Christopher Paolini:
I’ve given a great deal of thought to what I’ll write after I finish this series. Since I began Eragon, I’ve plotted out a host of stories, of all different genres, that I would like to tackle. However, at the moment, my fourth book is the main focus of my attention, and I can’t afford to devote too much energy thinking about other books.

As for pressure . . . I don’t feel any about leaving the Inheritance cycle, but I do feel pressure to finish it in a timely manner. And while I’ll be sad to let go of the world and characters I’ve been laboring on for the past eleven years, I know it’ll also be equally exciting to move on to new projects.

Terry Brooks:
I’ll be writing Eragon of Shannara sometime next year.

Christopher Paolini:
Ah, I want to read that. How long will it be, eleven books?

Terry Brooks:
Seriously, I think everyone is looking forward to seeing where you will go next. You’ve got a lot of great choices

Christopher Paolini:
Thanks.

Christopher Paolini:
Terry, given what we’ve just been talking about, do you have a favorite word? Least favorite? What’s the strangest word you’ve ever used? (I think *bombilation* is mine.)

[Comment From Rose]
Just so ya know chris, i’ll read anything u write lol


Terry Brooks:
I think “remainder” is my least favorite word, although “limited print run” comes close.

Christopher Paolini:
Ooh, that’s definitely my least favorite too.

[Comment From Steve]
Terry and Chrisopher, what are your favorite snacks for when you are writting?


Terry Brooks:
Favorite snacks? Eating is not allowed during working hours.

Christopher Paolini:
Coconut milk mixed with unsweetened chocolate powder. Yum.

[Comment From Fatima Potter]
This is to both, what other literature influenced your writing?


Christopher Paolini:
Everything I’ve ever read has influenced me as a writer, but especially myths and legends from all around the world.

Terry Brooks:
For me, William Faulkner. Might seem like a stretch, but Faulkner’s approach to writing about a small area in generational saga form intrigued me from the start. You can find it clearly in Shannara cycle.

Terry Brooks:
Also, the European adventure story writers – Stevenson, Dumas, and others.

Christopher Paolini:
Dumas is one of my favorites as well. I can read him over and over again.

Terry Brooks:
I would bet that not only Christopher and myself, but a lot of other writers of fantasy share the same influences.

[Comment From Justin]
what will eragon of shannara be about?


[Comment From Kim]
Hi Mr. Paolini! 😀 Love your books!


[Comment From David]
He was being funny.


Christopher Paolini:
Terry, since you’ve been writing fantasy for so long, do you find that you’re still drawn to the big story ideas, or has your focus of interest shifted to, say, more personal elements?

Terry Brooks:
I thnk the big saga still holds its appeal for me. But within that framework, its the personal stories of the characters that make the plot work.

[Comment From kshep]
What kind of music do you guys listen to when writing books


Terry Brooks:
I don’t listen to anything when writing. I grew up in a cone of silence. But I listen to rock and roll all the time when just free form thinking

[Comment From Lora Schaeffer]
To all fans just coming in: arm yourself with a dictionary!!


[Comment From Nina]
When is Book #4 coming out? My grandson can’t wait!!!


Christopher Paolini:
Lots of movie soundtracks (Waterworld, Conan, the Pirates movies, etc), panpipe music from the Andies (perfect for elves), and Russian liturgical music (perfect for dwarves).

Terry Brooks:
Wait a minute! Where’s the rock and roll?

[Comment From PadfootUnewraithSlayer]
You listen to music like I do, CP!


[Comment From Paige]
Love that! Great taste, Christopher!


Christopher Paolini:
My dad listens to that.

Michelle F.:
Christopher is busy writing away on Book Four and we can’t wait to share it with the world! We don’t have a date yet…but stay tuned.

[Comment From Lexie]
I like Terry’s taste!


Michelle F.:
Oh, that’s a great picture of Eragon’s Guide to Alagaesia, which is coming out next month. It’s such a cool project with lots of great interactive stuff inside!

Christopher Paolini:
Yup. Took a lot of work, but I’m very proud of it. Hopefully everyone will get a kick out of it.

[Comment From David]
Terry, where did you come up the idea for the Landover series?


Betsy Mitchell:
This is Terry’s latest hardcover. We all love the cover art.

Christopher Paolini:
I can’t wait to read “A Princess of Landover”. I’ve been a fan of the Landover series since before I wrote Eragon. It’s a wonderful story. Lot’s of fun.

[Comment From Paige]
Beautiful book


Shawn Speakman:
I love the dedication. 🙂

[Comment From Michael C.]
Nice. Gotta love the cover art.


Michelle F.:
Eragon’s Guide comes out on November 3rd.

Terry Brooks:
About Landover and Magic Kingdom. My editor, Lester del Rey, gave it to me on loan. He envisioned a Piers Anthony Xanth series sort of book. I saw something darker and more complex and personal. Landover has always been autobiographical.

[Comment From lobo]
amazing covers!


[Comment From Kim]
agrred


[Comment From Sourabh Subramaniam]
what is the meaning of the reference to the lonely god in brisingr


Christopher Paolini:
It means, look for the man in the blue box. . . .

[Comment From Sam]
That just leaves more questions than answers!!


Christopher Paolini:
I know.

[Comment From Jason Wilson]
Christopher and Terry , what do you do for fun when your not writing?


[Comment From bev montague]
Terry, I am 52 years young and have been reading sci-fi-fantasy all my life. I am currently working my way through ALL your books, and am having a GREAT time doing it! Being disabled, I thank you for putting the magic back into my life. Can’t wait to read “Eragon of Shannara” when it comes out! And thanks to Christopher as well for all the wonderful reading hours of the Inheritance Cycle. Well done!


[Comment From David_L_Ewing]
Write more. Lol.


Terry Brooks:
I drink to forget. Okay, kidding. I read and go to movies. i travel the world. I do stuff with my grandson that involves gaming.

Christopher Paolini:
Reading, exercise, video games (Halo 1-3, ODST, Oblivion, etc.), talking with friends and family, drawing, chain mail, anything I can do to get my mind off writing.

[Comment From Chey Murray]
I have a question for either author…what do you use to keep yourself motivated? Or to get yourself into the right mood to write?


[Comment From Mike]
I love Halo!!


Terry Brooks:
You don’t need motivation to keep writing if you’re a real writer. You just do it because you aren’t complete if you don’t.

Christopher Paolini:
Terry said it.

Christopher Paolini:
Writing stories is its own reward.

[Comment From Andrease of Ael]
What do you do when you have Writer’s block?


Shawn Speakman:
Nice camel.

Christopher Paolini:
Usually writer’s block hits me when I’m too tired or burned out to think creatively. Then, it becomes nearly impossible for me to figure out how to describe a scene in a readable manner, or even what I should describe. The best solution I’ve found is to walk away from the computer and do something completely different, whether it’s exercise, cleaning, talking with friends—anything to give my mind a rest from the book.

Betsy Mitchell:

Terry and his wife Judine, on a camel, in Dubai.

Terry Brooks:
Which one in the picture is Terry Brooks?

Christopher Paolini:
Ha!

[Comment From Reader]
Crawl underneath it, Andrease 🙂


Christopher Paolini:
I want to ride on a camel someday.

Terry Brooks:
Good response to the writer’s block question, Christopher

Christopher Paolini:
Thanks.

Terry Brooks:
Riding a camel has its ups and downs.

Christopher Paolini:
Ooh . . . bad joke.

[Comment From Enchantergal]
To both the writers Do the characters in your books match anyone in real life?


Christopher Paolini:
Like: “‘I see,’ cried the blind man, as he picked up his hammer and saw.

Terry Brooks:
I tend to write about my editors and agents. Sometimes other writers. They usually appear as trolls.

[Comment From Jonathon Pucek]
Christopher, is the name Hrothgar taken from the Beowulf epic?


Christopher Paolini:
The only character in my books who is based on a real person is Angela the Herbalist, who I based on my sister, Angela.

Terry Brooks:
I wrote about my dog, Abernathy, in Magic Kingdom.

[Comment From Joseph Hileman]
Did either of you read Tarzan Series… not the disney version?


Christopher Paolini:
Yes, Hrothgar is from Beowulf. I love Beowulf, especially the Seamus Heaney translation.

[Comment From Joseph Hileman]
Angela gives me the creeps


Terry Brooks:
I’ve read all of Burroughs. Not William, either.

Christopher Paolini:
I’ve read every single Tarzan book.

[Comment From Guest]
I like Angela’s character!


[Comment From Domia Abr Wyrda]
i love abernathy


[Comment From Maddy]
Angela is my favorite character in the book!


Christopher Paolini:
Good, because if you don’t, she’ll come after you with her werecat.

[Comment From Maggie]
To either of you, how much can you usually write in a day?


Terry Brooks:
I do three to five pages a day, usually. But I don’t work every day because I am not insane.

[Comment From Justin]
will the last eragon book have more pages than the other 3?


Christopher Paolini:
It depends. Some days I can write more than others. Given the size of my books, however, it’s usually never as much as I would have liked.

Christopher Paolini:
I hope not!

Betsy Mitchell:
Terry, that’s all??? I have this vision of you slaving away for hours on end, because you always finish your books on deadline. My bubble is burst.

Christopher Paolini:
No, that’s me.

Terry Brooks:
I do slave, I just don’t accomplish much

Michelle F.:
I hope so too, Christopher!

[Comment From Guest]
more pages = more fun!


[Comment From David_L_Ewing]
agreed


[Comment From SeithrDrottningu]
Yay for 3000 page books!


Terry Brooks:
More pages = a larger book.

Christopher Paolini:
More pages equal fewer trees.

[Comment From Penelope]
So, wait, where do you two meet?


Terry Brooks:
We met in a bar. I was a customer, Christopher was with his father. Or not. We met at Maui Writers Conference, but had talked before then on the phone.

Christopher Paolini:
Actually . . . we first met at ComicCon, or in a bar. Can’t remember.

[Comment From Robert Golden]
How did you create the structure for the world the character live in? (more specifically the natural laws that goern magic and creature strength)


Shawn Speakman:
Remember, people, both of the writers LIE for a living. 🙂

Terry Brooks:
The schematic of magic has to be consistent throughout. That takes a lot of work.

Christopher Paolini:
By asking myself what I wanted to be possible within Eragon’s world and what the natural consequences of such possibilities would be.

[Comment From Aidan Moher]
Terry: As an established writer, what kind of advice do you have for a young writer like Christopher when it comes to handling the criticism that’s inherent in having a career in a creative art?


Christopher Paolini:
Great question.

[Comment From D.]
Christopher. i would just like to say thanks for Eragon. my once humble little bookshelf, now tightly packed, is the result of picking up your book as a young boy.


[Comment From Chris Speciale]
Really good question.


Terry Brooks:
I would tell Christopher that everything changes as you grow, and be prepared to abandon everything you thought you knew at some point. You have to learn flexibility. You also have to remember that this is fun before anything or it isn’t worth it. Also, you have to listen to your instincts.

Christopher Paolini:
I’ll do my best to keep that in mind.

[Comment From Enchantergal]
awesome answer


[Comment From guest]
great advice


[Comment From GitRDunn]
Terry and Chris, do you lock yourselves away in a private room like a hermit when you’re writing, or do you allow yourselves to be interrupted by the phone or by someone else in the house, etc.


Betsy Mitchell:
To all of you posting questions: We are getting inundated! There are so many of you on line. It’s obvious we’ll never be able to answer all of these tonight, but Terry and Christopher promise to answer more of them tonight or tomorrow and we’ll post them as well.

Terry Brooks:
Bum glue, as another writer has said. Sit down and write. No excuses.

[Comment From David]
I love your books Chris!!


Christopher Paolini:
Nope, no interruptions. When I’m writing, no one and nothing can get me to leave the computer/notebook/vellum/goat’s skin.

Terry Brooks:
Christopher will be here every night for the next week. Good luck.

[Comment From Lora Schaeffer]
To both writers, who was/is the hardest character to write about in your books?


Christopher Paolini:
D. thanks for telling me that. I hope you keep reading and writing for the rest of your life.

Christopher Paolini:
Arya is the hardest character for me to write.

Terry Brooks:
The bad guy who has a good side. Interesting because you have to work hard at making someone innately unpleasant become likeable.

[Comment From Domia Abr Wyrda]
Christopher and Terry, who are your favorite super heros and why?


Christopher Paolini:
Or rather, she was. I’ve gotten better at writing Arya since Eldest.

Betsy Mitchell:
My alter ego is Blue Pencil Girl, super-editor.

Christopher Paolini:
Batman of course.

Terry Brooks:
Christopher Paolini is my favorite super hero. I admire youth and perseverance. Spiderman is a distant second.

Christopher Paolini:
Ahhh, Terry wins.

[Comment From Samantha]
Where do you get name ideas from?


[Comment From Talon]
Holy metal, batman!


[Comment From Kimbo]
Haha


Christopher Paolini:
Everywhere. Also, Belgium.

Terry Brooks:
I steal them. Really. From everywhere I go in my travels. Street signs, store fronts, maps, etc. I keep a list and make them over for my own uses.

Christopher Paolini:
Yup, that sounds about right.

[Comment From Maggie Reale]
I’m your biggest fan, and fellow ex-home schooler, CP!!


[Comment From Jonathon Pucek]
Terry and Christopher, how did you first get into writing?


Christopher Paolini:
I read all of the fantasy books in my local library, didn’t have a job, wasn’t enrolled in school, and got really, really bored.

Terry Brooks:
I’ve been writing stories since I was ten. I don’t know how to do anything else.

[Comment From Arya_grl]
Christopher, I am a 15 -year-old homeschooler and I love the Inheritance Cycle! Has homeschooling affected your books in any way?


[Comment From jake]
The inheritance cycle rocks!


Christopher Paolini:
It gave me the opportunity to learn at my own pace and taught me to love knowledge of all kinds.

[Comment From Jason Wilson]
If both of you weren’t writers what would you have done in life?


Terry Brooks:
I would starve. Or still be a lawyer

Christopher Paolini:
I would have ended up telling stories some other way, whether with art, or movies, or music.

[Comment From Andrease of Ael]
haha, good answer!


[Comment From Jon]
Brooks – Professional wrestler, Paulini – mad scientist


[Comment From Jill]
It seems that both of you have a natural telent for writing. Do you think people without this talent can still write successfully?


Terry Brooks:
No.

[Comment From Lauren]
In Brisingr, when Eragon first said his sword’s name, it said it was a “smokeless fire.” But when opening the gates a Feinster, it said something like the smoke was choking him. Was it just he was using more energy to sustain the fire on his sword?


Terry Brooks:
Okay, yes, But you have to work very hard.

[Comment From GitRDunn]
I know C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien, along with some other writers, formed a group which met regularly so that they could critique each others’ writing and help out each other. Do either of you have any type of system like this?


Christopher Paolini:
Anyone can learn the technical aspects of writing, but it’s much, much harder, if not impossible, to teach the desire or ability to tell an entertaining story.

[Comment From Bart]
And if you have no talent, you must have a very good editor!


Terry Brooks:
I do things socially with lots of different writers, but we don’t talk much about work. We do lie to each other a lot about stuff.

Christopher Paolini:
The smoke in Brisingr came from the burning/oxidizing metal that Eragon was cutting, if I remember correctly.

[Comment From Ian Kocher]
Christopher, thank you for the Inheritance Cycle!


Christopher Paolini:
Thanks for reading it!

[Comment From David W.]
Chris, it seems you have changed Arya’s personality a bit over the three books; her demeanor has lightened a little each book. Any reason for this?


Betsy Mitchell:

Terry, you are a world traveler. Is there a particular locale in any of your novels that is based on a real place?

Terry Brooks:
Several of the Shannara books have the roots of their settings in Canada and the Pacific NW. Also, two use Hawaii.

Christopher Paolini:
Yes: in the first and second books, Arya was still recovering from being tortured for months while she was Durza’s captive. That’s not something you get over in a few days.

Michelle F.:

We’ll take a couple more questions before we have to wrap up.

[Comment From Jonathon Pucek]
Terry and Christopher, how do you deal with people that criticize fantasy writing? People that think fantasy is either stupid or pointless?


[Comment From guest]
Terry, I love you sense of humor!


Terry Brooks:
I tell them that fantasy is the root of almost all fiction. Elements can be found in everything from literary fiction to manga. Everyoe steals from fantasy.

[Comment From Lora Schaeffer]
to the editors: are there any quirks or habits that you find in either author’s writing? Like they always misspell a word, etc?


Christopher Paolini:
Ignore them, of course. If that was really the case, then you have to throw out Beowulf, The Odyssey, The Tempest, A Midsummer’s Night Dream, etc.

Terry Brooks:
I hate it when writers don’t proofread and apparently dont care. I take a lot of pride in not making mistakes

Michelle F.:
Christopher has an intense love of commas.

Betsy Mitchell:
Terry is one of the most easygoing authors an editor could wish to work for. Except when it comes to the matter of titles. We often mud-wrestle over the best title for a book.

Christopher Paolini:
Same here. It’s my name on the book, and I want to make sure that everything is as good as possible.

Terry Brooks:
I find it hard to believe that Betsy can be right about so much, but wrong about titles to often.

Shawn Speakman:
Ha!

[Comment From Stephen]
do you sleep with a dragon teddy?


Christopher Paolini:
Commas are the glue that hold a text together.

Christopher Paolini:
No, no dragon teddy.

Terry Brooks:
I have a wife, thanks. But I do have a favorite stuffed dog

Betsy Mitchell:
Terry–tell people what you’re working on now before we have to end!

Terry Brooks:
Two more books in the Genesis cycle.

[Comment From Sourabh Subramaniam]
could we ever read those parts that were edited out of your books to shorten their length


[Comment From deborah]
A stuffed animal dog? Or a dog you had stuffed?


Terry Brooks:
Either one will do.

[Comment From SeithrDrottningu]
Poor puppy 🙁


Christopher Paolini:
Terry, are you a secret taxidermist?

Michelle F.:
Check out BRISINGR DELUXE, which includes a couple of deleted scenes. It just went on sale yesterday.

Terry Brooks:
Hey, Christopher, it’s been fun

[Comment From Andrease of Ael]
Thank you both for doing this!


Christopher Paolini:
Same here. We’ll have to do this again sometime.

[Comment From Joseph Hileman]
noooo don’t go!


[Comment From Jason Wilson]
thanks for time fellas keep up the great work


[Comment From SeithrDrottningu]
PLEASE STAY!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Christopher Paolini:
If we don’t, our books will never get finished.

[Comment From Ivie]
Keep writing!


Suvudu Chat Mod:
OK, thanks everyone for joining the chat with Terry and Christopher! The authors will answer a few more of your questions that came in during the chat a bit later. So be sure to check back here to see if your questions were answered.

[Comment From Bryce Leo]
Thanks so much you guys!

[Comment From yawe]
thank you all so very much!


[Comment From Guest]
will this be posted somewhere online?


[Comment From Gabriele]
Thank you.


[Comment From Saeb]
We really appreciate this Christopher and Terry!


Christopher Paolini:
Glad you could all participate.

[Comment From Jonathon Pucek]

Thanks guys!

  • Hayden

    yeah, my internet goes out randomly sometimes, too.

  • MeghanSwiftSword

    Yeah, he said so in the letter at the end of Brisingr. Awesome interview!

  • Trope

    Christopher Paolini watches Doctor Who?

  • ShaneRahn

    hey i would like to know how far chris is on book 4. i’m fine with not knowing what will happen in the book. i would just like to know a general time of the year that he expects to get done.

  • PadfootUnewraithSlayer

    Just rub it in, Terminator! ;D Hahaha

  • Terminator

    I got three!

  • PadfootUnewraithSlayer

    I was there, but I only got one comment through.

  • Autum

    I wasnt there for the live event. This is realy awesome that I can read it after it hapend. CP is totally awesome.

  • PadfootUnewraithSlayer

    Thanks.

  • Terminator

    Easy, just scroll down to the bottom of the page, and then you’ll see a link “Next” and just click on that till you have the right page. But they have posted A LOT of stuff after the Interview, so you’re going to have to dig to find it.

  • PadfootUnewraithSlayer

    Thank you guys for telling me, but there is one problem, I don’t know how to navigate that site, can someone please help me, like send me the link or something? Please and thank you, mates!

  • T>J>

    Only thing i can say is that i think Terry should run with the “Eragon of Shannara” just think how awesome that would be…

  • lynn

    thanks guys:)

  • Taslin

    ok! Thanks

  • SeithrDrottningu

    EEEKS!!!!! 3 of my comments got posted!!!!!!!!!!!!! I’m SOOOOO lucky!!!!!!!!!!! I had like 30 questions&comments I posted, so I was bound to have at least 1 comment on there but still, EEEKS!!!!! That hour went by so fast; it was over B4 I knew it. 🙁 But it was fun!

  • Shadeslayer70

    Ahh, thank you so much Bob, and the rest of the shurtugal staff for posting this. Unfortunatly I missed the live event, so this is really cool of you guys. This was the first time i had ever really heard anything of Terry Brooks, and man he is funny. Great now I’ll probably have to end up reading his books too ;). I loved the quote “More pages = a larger book”

    Again thank you shurtugal for all of this hard work, this site is what keeps me held over until the fourth book comes out. Everyone on here is so cool, and i enjoy talking with all of you.

    (Padfoot, i saw they put one of yours on there 😉

  • Evarinya

    Awesome! Thanks for putting this up guys :]
    I wish I could have gone.. But I got the times messed up :S

  • Terminator

    Padfoot: It’d be in the old posts, all they had was a few things on the Weather that they posted. The Author’s didn’t answer anything else, unfortunately.

  • PadfootUnewraithSlayer

    “OK, thanks everyone for joining the chat with Terry and Christopher! The authors will answer a few more of your questions that came in during the chat a bit later. So be sure to check back here to see if your questions were answered.”

    Where did they do that? I cannot find it!

  • All.Hail.Emperor.Murtagh

    Well, at least something was finally posted here. The interview will follow shortly, I hope.

  • mmmmmm

    k im gonna do wat HEWHOISAFOOL did and put mt question in, in brisingr saphira complains about her wings and how they are sore i think she said, was it just me or wen i was readin it that sounded so weird could this mean somethin

  • seth

    what is the name of the fourth book in your cycle

  • Mike

    Terry Brooks was definitely joking when he said he was going to write “Eragon of Shannara”.

  • Rick

    Hi I’m a huge fan

  • mufajir01

    also guys eragon of shannara
    is a real book that is about to be written by terry
    or at least thats the ipression i got from the interview!

  • mufajir01

    thanks a lot guys!!!
    really appreciate all the work u put into this website!!
    cant wait for the surprise

  • Daniel

    The whole page is in italics. Is it supposed to be that way, or is it an error in the code?

  • Terminator

    CP answered one of my questions!

  • RockYourSocks

    Wow, that got confusing as to what question’s they were awnsering at what time!

    Also on the subject of weather in scotland it is poring with rain!

  • Sarah

    Taslin, I think he was joking when he said that bit about “Eragon of Shannara.” It’s not a real book.

  • Gizmo

    I know cp cannot tell us when book 4 will be out but he could, maby, tell use how far he is in writing it e.g 1/2 way.

  • EbirithAbrBrisingr

    I got the days wrong. 🙁

    I wasn’t able to go to it.

  • Taslin

    does anyone now what’s “Eragon of Shannara”? Is it a book? If it is, it’s about what?

  • Ganon:RiderofArgorok

    To HeWhoIsAFool, if it was in Du Weldenvarden then I think that she was speaking in the Ancient Language. I don’t know exactly where it was, but it says somewhere that, whilst Eragon was in Ellesmera, he was speaking constantly in the Ancient Language

  • HeWhoIsAFool

    there is something i wanted to know. i post it in every q/a but since it doesn’t seem that the transcript from the last one is going to be released i’m just going to post a question here and hope that a fellow guest/member knows the answer : When arya told eragon in eldest that she only sees him as a friend was she speaking in ancient language? since you ‘re not christopher so as to know it just tell me if there is any hint indicating it.

  • Maco

    Oh… and on the subject of weather, we have a foot of snow here in Colorado and school’s canceled today. =p

  • Maco

    Thanks guys! This looks like it was a lot of work.

  • Vegtam

    I like the way Brooks kept making digs at Paolini. I do hope he learns from Brook’s advice, though.

    Also, the editor war was awesome. XD

  • Mike

    Thank Bob – he formatted it for posting. 🙂

  • Sarah

    Thanks for putting this together. I tried to follow the chat live, but my internet connection here is terrible.